Boundary Value Testing

For this week’s blog post, I wanted to cover a topic that we covered earlier this semester, boundary value testing. I found an article on seemingly my go to site for articles for this blog, guru99. The article has several sections including a brief definition on what boundary testing is, as well as a definition of what equivalent class partitioning is and the relationship between the two. There are also a couple of examples and an analysis section that explains why we should use equivalence and boundary testing.

The article describes boundary testing as “the process of testing between extreme ends of boundaries between partitions of the input values.” These extreme values include the lower and upper bounds, or the minimum and maximum acceptable values for a given variable. For boundary testing, you need more than just the minimum and maximum values though. For the actual testing, you need a value that is just above the minimum, a nominal value that lies somewhere in the middle of the range, and a value that is just below the maximum value.

Equivalent class partitioning is explained by the article as “a black box technique (code is not visible to tester) which can be applied to all levels of testing.” It also states that when using equivalent class partitioning, “you divide the set of test condition into a partition that can be considered the same”.  This may sound a bit confusing but it is actually pretty simple. The article uses an example of a ticket system where values 1-10 are the only acceptable values and values 11-99 are invalid. You could break up this set of numbers into two different equivalent class partitions and then returning back to our boundary testing concept, we would test values like 0, 1, 5, 9, and 10.

The best part about boundary testing is that because it is a form of black box testing, you do not need to see how the actual code works. You only need to know the specifications for the valid and invalid numbers. Another reason to use boundary testing is that it eliminates the need for testing every value and thus, minimizes the tests needed. I have and will continue to utilize this testing strategy throughout my software engineering career.

Link to original article: https://www.guru99.com/equivalence-partitioning-boundary-value-analysis.html

 

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