Testing & Agile

For this week’s blog post, I decided to find a blog post on a topic that we haven’t explicitly covered in class. I found an article on Agile Testing and my interest in Agile as a whole drew me in. This article is on QASymphony and breaks down what Agile methodology is, some examples of Agile testing, and how to align testing with the Agile delivery process. For the sake of this post, I will assume you’re familiar with the general concept of the Agile methodology for software development, hopefully you understand the general concept of Scrum and Kanban.

One of the interesting testing strategies for Agile development is the Behavior Driven Development tests (BDD). These tests are similar to the Test Driven Development (TDD) style testing systems in traditional waterfall development cycles. They are basically a replacement. Instead of writing unit tests before code is written, the BDD tests are on a much higher level. This is how user stories are written. The development of the code is based on end-user behavior and the tests need to be readable for those who might not be particularly technical as they can often replace requirement documentation. This saves time in the long run as there is no duplication of the process for those who might not be able to read user tests in the traditional TDD style of testing. The best part about BDD testing is that the tests do not necessarily need to be written by technical team members. These can, and are often written with input from business partners, scrum masters, and product owners who might not necessarily be able to contribute when it comes to writing unit tests in the TDD format. This style also allows for testing small snippets of functionality like TDD so that one aspect of TDD that is somewhat Agile remains intact for BDD testing.

After reading through the other testing strategies and how to align testing with the Agile methodology, I realized that I’ve already been working in systems that operate like this at my summer internships. We operated our testing in a format pretty much identical to the concept of BDD where everyone in the team contributed to the different testing obstacles and even came up with test cases that would need to pass by code that was written afterwards. And like the article says, it was common for not all of the tests to pass immediately, and this is part of the concept of “failing fast” that Agile is all about. I am glad I found this article to give me more insight to how businesses around the world, including the ones I interned at, are converting to Agile and utilizing these testing strategies if they haven’t already.

Link to original article: https://www.qasymphony.com/blog/agile-methodology-guide-agile-testing/

 

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